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As a manager, how do you let go of your expert posture?

When you become a manager, it is inevitable to make a change of state of mind, to go from being an expert to a manager who coaches and gives a vision to his team. This change is easier said than done. Generally speaking, all managers with whom we collaborate understand the benefits of this change. However, the application is not so simple, because it requires changing behaviors that we have had for many years! And you, as a manager, do you succeed in adopting the position of manager-coach and abandoning the position of expert?

 As a reminder, the manager-coach helps people find their own answers in order to increase autonomy, commitment and performance. They ask a lot of questions, are good listeners, have the ability to suspend judgment, explore different options and offer development opportunities to others. This is different from the expert manager who more often than not provides the answer. To better assess whether you are able to move away from the expert posture, I...

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Why is it important to define your USC as a new manager?

Are you currently transitioning from a professional to a management position? Or have you recently experienced this type of transition? Have you reviewed your Unique Strategic Contribution (USC)? Unsurprisingly, taking on a new management role requires several adjustments in terms of your priorities to focus your attention on and your state of mind to meet your new challenges. Once in your new position, I invite you to ask yourself the following questions: What do I need to focus my attention on as a new manager? What is really important to me and what impact do I want to have on my team? To help you determine what you should focus your attention on, I suggest you define your Unique Strategic Contribution (USC).  

  

What is the USC 

The acronym USC stands for Unique Strategic Contribution. At o2, we define it as a concept that allows us to determine our highest strategic level, i.e. what only we ourselves need to accomplish...

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How can social styles help you avoid communication issues?

Do you ever have communication issues with some of your team members and wonder why? Do certain individuals misunderstand your message? Or do your communications sometimes fail to achieve the desired results? Do some individuals feel they are missing information after you’ve communicated it to them?  You may not share the same social style. Social styles represent how you perceive information, how you enjoy having it presented to you, how you digest it and how you react to it. They help us understand how others want us to communicate with them or how they will communicate with us.

 

Have you ever been impatient at a meeting? The next time it happens to you, observe! Is it the subject that makes you impatient or is it the way it is approached? Sometimes it's the subject, which we may find too operational, but often it's the way it's discussed that doesn't match the way we would communicate it ourselves.

 

According to Tracom's Social Styles model, there are 4...

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How to convince a manager that he must manage change 

Despite all the knowledge, experience and skills we can have in change management as an HR professional, what makes the difference is the manager’s leadership with employees who are experiencing said change. As HR professionals, we must primarily focus our efforts on what follows. Our role is to help the manager realize the impact of his leadership on the success of change by convincing him of his responsibility to manage change. 

A quantifiable impact 

Managers love facts and data; and hence I like presenting the results of the Korn Ferry studies to the manager. Works every time! According to the results of the studies, up to 70% of the work climate is influenced by the manager’s leadership. 70%! And I think we all agree that in times of change, the work climate is of paramount importance to ensure successful change management. 

Here is a recap of the 6 dimensions of the work climate,...

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3 tips for managing a difficult employee

As a manager, would you like your team to always demonstrate a collaborative behavior? I imagine so. Is that the case? Perhaps not all the time, as the reality of organizations brings its share of daily challenges, which sometimes causes some employees to behave in ways not only harmful to the team, but also to the work environment. Have you ever had a difficult employee on your team? How did it impact you and your team? It might have impacted morale, confidence, work climate and possibly your desire to come to work. The impact of a difficult employee can be major on you and your team, both in terms of well-being and performance. It is therefore important to ACT, dissociating the behavior of the person, listening to the employee’s point of view and engaging them in the next steps. Have you ever brushed off a difficult conversation with an employee? You might have thought the situation will solve itself as this person in question did not manifest such behaviour previously or...

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